Troma Nakmo

troma-nagmo

Mineral pigment, gold, gouache and acrylic on primed cotton.
In the collection of Charlyn Edwards, 2011

Prints are available in the following sizes.
Small 8½×11 : $45
Medium 11x14 : $65
Large 14x20 : $95

The wrathful black dakini, Troma Nakmo, is an expression of compassionate primordial awareness and wisdom. Padampa Sangye, the Indian mahasiddha, is believed to have first introduced her practice into Tibet during the 12th century. He received the sadhana from Aryadeva, who had previously received it from Virupa.

Troma Nakmo is considered to be the wrathful aspect of Prajnaparamita, the perfection of transcendent wisdom. She plays a key role within the Shije and Chod lineages and to some extent the Nyingma lineage. Her ferocity or wrath is projected through the means of unbridled compassion for all beings.

She is as vast as space, the ground from which all things arise and fall. Her skin is black azure, recalling the womb of all experience. Three eyes intensely gaze into timeless spacelessness. The head of a black sow encircled by a green snake rises from her mass of flaming hair representing absolute reality. She is crowned by five skulls signifying her power to transform neurosis into clarity and wisdom. Her body is adorned with five bone ornaments of the charnel grounds. Those ornaments, together with her bodily form, represent the six paramitas.

Flayed elephant, human and tiger skins serve as her clothing, a reminder of having destroyed the three poisons of ignorance, desire and anger. A necklace of fifty one freshly severed heads sway across her dancing body, showing that she has purified the fifty one mental factors.

Her right hand held high brandishing a flaying knife cuts through all dualistic confusion. At her heart in her left hand rests a skull cup filled with frothing blood. While leaning in the crook of the same arm is a Khatvanga, symbolizing ultimate bodhicitta as the union of bliss and emptiness. Her left leg presses into the heart of a human corpse, dancing the death of ignorance.

troma-nagmo

Mineral pigment, gold, gouache and acrylic on primed cotton.
In the collection of Charlyn Edwards, 2011

The wrathful black dakini, Troma Nakmo, is an expression of compassionate primordial awareness and wisdom. Padampa Sangye, the Indian mahasiddha, is believed to have first introduced her practice into Tibet during the 12th century. He received the sadhana from Aryadeva, who had previously received it from Virupa.

Troma Nakmo is considered to be the wrathful aspect of Prajnaparamita, the perfection of transcendent wisdom. She plays a key role within the Shije and Chod lineages and to some extent the Nyingma lineage. Her ferocity or wrath is projected through the means of unbridled compassion for all beings.

She is as vast as space, the ground from which all things arise and fall. Her skin is black azure, recalling the womb of all experience. Three eyes intensely gaze into timeless spacelessness. The head of a black sow encircled by a green snake rises from her mass of flaming hair representing absolute reality. She is crowned by five skulls signifying her power to transform neurosis into clarity and wisdom. Her body is adorned with five bone ornaments of the charnel grounds. Those ornaments, together with her bodily form, represent the six paramitas.

Flayed elephant, human and tiger skins serve as her clothing, a reminder of having destroyed the three poisons of ignorance, desire and anger. A necklace of fifty one freshly severed heads sway across her dancing body, showing that she has purified the fifty one mental factors.

Her right hand held high brandishing a flaying knife cuts through all dualistic confusion. At her heart in her left hand rests a skull cup filled with frothing blood. While leaning in the crook of the same arm is a Khatvanga, symbolizing ultimate bodhicitta as the union of bliss and emptiness. Her left leg presses into the heart of a human corpse, dancing the death of ignorance.

Prints are available in the following sizes.
Small 8½×11 : $45
Medium 11x14 : $65
Large 14x20 : $95

Jogeg Arts

Karma Ghadri Paintings by Ben Barta

Jogeg Arts

Karma Ghadri Paintings by Ben Barta